BlueAngel Community Health Grants

At Blue Cross & Blue Shield of Rhode Island, our vision is to passionately lead a state of health and well-being across Rhode Island. The BlueAngel Community Health Grant program – an annual, competitive grant program – allows us to further our vision by addressing critical health issues in Rhode Island. We achieve this by partnering with community–based agencies that are trying to improve the health of Rhode Islanders. This funding program is the cornerstone of our community investment activities at BCBSRI, and we are proud of the organizations we have worked with and the results achieved since it began 17 years ago.

Our BlueAngel Community Health Grant program currently supports access to safe and affordable housing. By investing in this area, we hope to improve health outcomes for Rhode Islanders and improve quality of life, particularly for low–income and vulnerable populations. We understand that health is so much more than what happens within the confines of the healthcare system and we know health outcomes do not rest solely upon medical interventions, but also depend on basic needs being met, and safe and affordable housing chief among them. There is strong evidence characterizing housing’s relationship to health. Housing stability, quality, safety, and affordability all affect health outcomes, as do physical and social characteristics of neighborhoods.

We’re grateful to partner with these organizations for our 2020 grant program year:

FAQ

Organizations are eligible for grants from Blue Cross if they have qualified for exemption under Section 501(c)(3) of the IRS Code or are public instrumentalities (e.g., a government entity). Grants are not awarded to individuals. Private foundations [as defined by Section 509(a) of the Code] are not eligible for funding.

Blue Cross provides funding for existing, new, and expanding programs.

Yes, as they relate to a specific program. For instance, we would be unlikely to fund ABC nonprofit’s executive director position, but more likely to fund personnel costs associated with a program (such as a counselor to provide nutrition classes).

An organization may not apply for more than one BlueAngel Community Health grant during the year. Applicants who receive a grant may not submit another letter of intent or proposal for funding the same program within the same year. Applicants who are not approved for funding are welcome to reapply in the next grant cycle.

Blue Cross is not currently making multiyear grant awards. However, applicants who receive funding may apply for second-year transitional funding.

Yes, as long as the proposed effort is not for religious purposes.

Yes. However, we prefer to be a funding partner along with other sources of revenue. We believe an application is strengthened by seeking multiple sources of support (as this is a key indicator of sustainability).

Blue Cross will fund acquisition of equipment as it relates to a specific program, but is unlikely to fund equipment alone. Please note that we typically do not fund construction (e.g., bricks and mortar).

Blue Cross will not fund projects or programs of fraternal or religious organizations where the primary beneficiaries are members of these organizations. We also do not contribute to organizations seeking contributions for advertising space, tickets, or sponsorship of dinners, fundraising events, or promotional materials. Additionally, the BACHG program does not fund requests from hospitals.

No, but we fund agencies that can help individuals.

While Blue Cross does not have a strict policy against indirect costs, we do not look favorably upon applications that request excessive costs in this area. Projects requesting funding for direct service or program-related costs (e.g., supplies, education materials, salaries) are viewed more favorably.

There is no maximum or minimum grant amount. Historically, funding amounts have ranged from $25,000 per year to $75,000 per year.

Amos House will expand its Financial Opportunity Center to have a dedicated Housing Advocate, which will increase the number of clients they are able to support with housing searches, application support and resources to those seeking permanent housing.
Child & Family supports Rhode Islanders experiencing homelessness at their eight-unit Supportive Housing site in Newport. Families can utilize Supportive Housing for up to two years while they build their vocational skills, work toward educational goals, access critical case management and other services to enable future self-sustainability.
Foster Forward’s “Your Way Home” program is a rapid re-housing program, providing youth aging out of the foster care system with dedicated case management and access to workforce development programs, financial capability education and mentoring to ensure that they do not become homeless.
Lucy’s Hearth will provide housing navigation services to families for up to six months after their stay in Lucy’s Hearth’s family shelter. Families will be connected with housing programs, receive education around landlord negotiation and tenant rights, and have access to many other supportive services.
OpenDoors provides housing-based reentry support for formerly incarcerated individuals through their Resource Center, Permanent Housing Residences, and their 9 Yards transitional house. Comprehensive reentry support will be provided to 90 individuals through an expanded case management service, and 390 people will receive help with basic supports at a drop-in Resource Center.
Providence Housing Authority (PHA) will utilize a full-time AmeriCorps member from the Accessing Home program to provide supportive services, referrals, application assistance and more to Rhode Islanders who have previously experienced homelessness and to existing Section 8 voucher holders struggling to maintain housing. PHA will also develop educational materials, provide technical assistance and develop incentives for more Providence landlords to participate in the Section 8 program.
The Rhode Island Center for Justice will work with community partners to expand its representation of low-income tenants facing housing insecurity, homelessness and unsafe and unhealthy conditions in their homes. The Center for Justice, as a member of the HomesRI Policy Coalition, will work toward positive policy changes to make all low-income tenants more secure in their homes, protect them from unjust and unrepresented evictions and improve substandard housing conditions in low-income rentals.
Rhode Island Legal Services (RILS) represents tenants whose apartment conditions pose potential health and safety issues and holds landlords accountable to provide health-related repairs as is legally required. RILS will also provide trainings at community sites and social service agencies around tenant rights, eviction, enforcing housing code, health problems associated with substandard housing and more.
Sojourner House will provide rapid re-housing for victims of interpersonal violence, and expand its bilingual Housing Clinic, which helps victims and survivors with housing resources, filling out housing applications, housing searches and rights education under the Violence Against Women Act. Sojourner House will also expand its local landlord outreach and education, hosting trainings and networking sessions, which will ultimately help Sojourner House clients find housing.

FAQ

Organizations are eligible for grants from Blue Cross if they have qualified for exemption under Section 501(c)(3) of the IRS Code or are public instrumentalities (e.g., a government entity). Grants are not awarded to individuals. Private foundations [as defined by Section 509(a) of the Code] are not eligible for funding.

Blue Cross provides funding for existing, new, and expanding programs.

Yes, as they relate to a specific program. For instance, we would be unlikely to fund ABC nonprofit’s executive director position, but more likely to fund personnel costs associated with a program (such as a counselor to provide nutrition classes).

An organization may not apply for more than one BlueAngel Community Health grant during the year. Applicants who receive a grant may not submit another letter of intent or proposal for funding the same program within the same year. Applicants who are not approved for funding are welcome to reapply in the next grant cycle.

Blue Cross is not currently making multiyear grant awards. However, applicants who receive funding may apply for second-year transitional funding.

Yes, as long as the proposed effort is not for religious purposes.

Yes. However, we prefer to be a funding partner along with other sources of revenue. We believe an application is strengthened by seeking multiple sources of support (as this is a key indicator of sustainability).

Blue Cross will fund acquisition of equipment as it relates to a specific program, but is unlikely to fund equipment alone. Please note that we typically do not fund construction (e.g., bricks and mortar).

Blue Cross will not fund projects or programs of fraternal or religious organizations where the primary beneficiaries are members of these organizations. We also do not contribute to organizations seeking contributions for advertising space, tickets, or sponsorship of dinners, fundraising events, or promotional materials. Additionally, the BACHG program does not fund requests from hospitals.

No, but we fund agencies that can help individuals.

While Blue Cross does not have a strict policy against indirect costs, we do not look favorably upon applications that request excessive costs in this area. Projects requesting funding for direct service or program-related costs (e.g., supplies, education materials, salaries) are viewed more favorably.

There is no maximum or minimum grant amount. Historically, funding amounts have ranged from $25,000 per year to $75,000 per year.

BCBSRI Logo - Feedback Survey

Tell us what you really think

It only takes a moment and your feedback can help us provide better service to you in the future.

Feedback